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Doom scrolling

Related to my post from earlier today. Seth on Doom scrolling

Getting hooked on an endless scroll of media inputs is not the same as being informed. There’s long been a business model of urgent news (“man bites dog!”), but now it’s been leveraged, amplified and optimized to suck people in for hours at a time.

https://seths.blog/2020/07/doom-scrolling/

I limit my news intake to a handpicked set of websites via Feedly and aim to check in once or twice a day, I don’t rarely listen to the news and try to use Twitter as a last resort. I don’t want or need to know everything that happens as it rarely brings me joys but I simply don’t have time.

Hanlon’s Razor and its effect in social media

I’ve often heard the term ‘Hanlon’s Razor’ – usually on tech podcasts – in relation companies doing the wrong thing and where people assume the worst and jump to conclusions. so decided to look it up.

‘Never attribute to malice that which is adequately explained by stupidity’

Robert J. Hanlon

An example of this can be seen when Apple was accused of slowing down old iPhones to force people to upgrade, where in fact an update was made to improve the performance of phones with older batteries by slowing them down a little to prevent a high peak power drawn causing the phone to crash.

The same effect can be seen on social media when people jump on the back of a scandalous story.

Modern media treats outrage as a profitable commodity. This often takes the form of articles which attribute malice to that which could be explained by incompetence or ignorance. We see examples of this play out in the media multiple times a day. People rush to take offense (sic) at anything which contradicts their worldview or which they imagine to do so. Media outlets are becoming increasingly skilled at generating assumptions of malicious intent. When looking at newspapers, websites, and social media, it can be beneficial to apply Hanlon’s razor to what we see.

https://fs.blog/2017/04/mental-model-hanlons-razor/

The lesson I take is not to see the worst in peoples mistakes but to assume they are busy, forgetful or hassled like the rest of us and to give them the benefit of the doubt. At least the first time. Not only will it help you to stay calm but it will also moderate your response and prevent a situation from escalating.

The quoted article from FS above, dives into detail as well as explaining other popular terms like Occam’s Razer. Well worth a read.

How to never be boring in conversation

Observations on Tom Hanks in conversation, with advice you can use to be a better presenter on video, in a workshop or even chatting down the pub.

Here’s a few tips I noted from the video

  • Create a story gap – Peak peoples interest with the promise of an exciting story.
  • Pantomime what you are saying – Use hand gestures and movement to act our what you are saying.
  • Be dynamic – Shift a story’s focus from sad to happy or move your voice from loud to quiet.
  • Include everyone – Make good eye contact (three seconds or so) so that people feel what you are saying is relevant to them, that they are included.

The last point, on eye contact, I’ve found particularly helpful in boosting my confidence when talking to a large group of people.

I’ve always enjoyed films featuring Tom Hanks from Big (his earliest film that I remember watching), to Castaway, Saving Private Ryan and Forest Gump, which is on my rewatch list.

Infectious Marketing: Get Local with Facebook and Google My business, 18th June 2020 – Free Webinar

Heidi CJ Shouting in megaphone

Our last Infectious Marketing webinar was so well received we’ve decided to put on another one.

In this webinar Heidi and I will focus on how you can use Facebook and Google My Business to make sure you are all set to attract local customers as the lockdown eases and people start to look for local services again.

This event has finished but you can watch the webinar video recording.

  • Advice on finding your ‘strategic alliances’ and collaborators
  • Tips on running a compliant Facebook competition and advice on using Hashtags
  • Steps to review your Google My Business Profile including tips on how to get more reviews.
  • Inspiration to bring people back to you with confidence
(more…)

Infectious Marketing, free webinar – May 14th 2020

Heidi CJ Shouting in megaphone

Heidi Chamberlain-Jones (Eat Sleep Live Herefordshire) and Ben Kinnaird (Rather Inventive Marketing) share their best ideas on using social media, email and presenting on video to stay connected during lockdown so you and your customers come out of this stronger together.

We’ll also look at the website and SEO improvements you could be making in this quiet time to prepare for a return to normality – Whatever that will look like!

This event has finished but you can watch the webinar video recording.

  • Tips to keep customers engaged and even get some new ones, ready for when the lockdown lifts.
  • Easy but effective marketing updates to do while you’re not changing the beds.
  • Inspiration to bring people back to you with confidence.
(more…)

Think harder about who you’re friends with

Euan Semple interviewed on Jonathon Pollinger’s #SocialMediaShow podcast

“When people moan at me about the rubbish on Facebook I point out that that’s your friends. And if you don’t like that then think harder about who you’re friends with”

I completely agree with Euan on this, we should all take more responsibility for the diet of news and comment that we read. And like any good food diet it should be varied.

The social pendulum swings back

Tweet from Andy McIlwain

The 2010s were about radically open social media platforms — a gigantic, unmanageable mess.

Next 10 years? Pendulum swings back. Niche communities of interest & purpose.

Like a falling tide, I feel that there is a pull back to smaller interest groups and communities. As a lapsed forum user (I spend much of my 20s in Macromedia Flash forums) and advocate of the WordPress Community, it feels more wholesome and personally connected to me.

Sure, we’ll still have the trolls and attention seekers but they won’t have as much impact or power often gained from retweeting.

In Andy’s Twitter thread he goes on to talk about how brands need to move from wooing an audience to building a community.

Break em out. Round tables so they’re facing and sharing and talking to each other.

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